Guest Post: Marcus Verus Christianus, Making Everyday a Christian Day

An anonymous reader of my blog sent the following and asked that I post it as a special installment for Holy Week.


Making Everyday a Christian Day

by Marcus Verus Christianus

Despite the influence of Christian tradition in Western civilization on the reckoning of years (BC/AD), most Western languages still retain overt pagan references for the days of the week. English is one of the most susceptible to this pagan influence:

  • Sunday comes from the worship of the sun.
  • Monday comes from the worship of the moon.
  • Tuesday comes from the worship of the Norse god Tiw, viewed as a substitute for the Roman god of war, Mars.
  • Wednesday comes from the worship of the Germanic god Woden (= Odin), viewed as a substitute for the Roman god Mercury.
  • Thursday comes from the worship of the Norse god Thor, viewed as a substitute for Jupiter as the bringer of lightning and thunder.
  • Friday comes from the worship of the Anglo-Saxon goddess Frige, viewed as a substitute for the Roman god Venus.
  • Saturday comes from the worship of the Roman god Saturn.

In Western Romance languages, two of these pagan references have at least been replaced with Judeo-Christian ones: Sabbath in place of Saturn, and the Lord’s Day (Domin*) in place of the sun. But this is not the case in English.

It is past time for the English language to cease being a vehicle of pagan worship. It is time for Christians who speak English to stop practicing pagan worship in the use of pagan terms for these days. English can become the most Christian language in the world if we only have the will to create, practice, and enforce a completely Christian set of naming conventions:

  • Sonday in honor of Jesus as the only son of God and the day of his resurrection.
  • Moesday in honor of Moses and the giving of God’s Word/Torah/Instruction.
  • Toesday in honor of Jesus washing the disciples’ feet.
  • Woesday in commemoration of the destruction of the first and second temples of Jerusalem, the Babylonian exile, and all woes that have befallen God’s people.
  • Foesday in recognition of Jesus’ commandment to love our enemies.
  • Freeday in honor of Jesus’ inaugural sermon about the liberation of slaves and debts.
  • Shaubday in recognition of the Jewish Sabbath/Shabbat, when Jesus himself rested in the grave.

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